AMERICAN POLITICAL ECONOMY

AMERICAN POLITICAL ECONOMY

Note

 All official communications between students and the Professor must be via Coppin e-mail address. Communications received from students with non-Coppin e-mail addresses will not be recognized.

Attendance, “Make-Up” and Participation Policies

 Absence, late arrivals, early departure and late submittal of assignments can reduce your grade in this course. Only under documented circumstances that preclude University’s compliance policies may student apply, in advance, for “make-ups” for exams, or other scheduled activities. Emergencies must be documented and reported as soon as possible. Controlling attention spans and maintaining professional levels of participation are goals of this course.

Electronic Communication Devices

Must be turned off during class session unless their use is incorporated into the day’s activities.

Special Needs

 Coppin State University supports all students in their academic endeavors.  Should you need academic accommodations because of a disability, please contact Ms. Pat Johnson, CSU’s Disability Support Services program (DSSP) counselor, to register for reasonable accommodations and to provide your Professor with documentation from DSSP about the accommodation. Ms. Johnson’s office is in HHSB 355. If you have already registered with this program, please provide the DSSP Accommodation Form to your Professor immediately to inform him of the required accommodation. Accommodation cannot reasonably be made for exams, evaluations and other course activities that take place before the professor receives the requisite DSSP documentation from the student.

Course Description

This Course is an examination of the political economy of the United States, which is both capitalist (the means of production are privately owned) and democratic (citizens compete for elected

offices). American political economy(APE) studies the relationship between politics and economics through a systematic exploration of power relations involved in economic production, distribution, exchange, consumption and the economic foundations of political life.

This course has two basic objectives: (1) to give the student an overview of how the American political economy works, and (2) to introduce the student to some key theories and analytical tools of the disciplines of economics and political science that can also be used to study other issues or other national political economies. We identify and analyze basic institutions and processes of the American political economy, showing how some of our more important economic and political institutions work and how they influence each other. Specifically, we discuss the role of private property rights and the price system in a free market economy and the radically different ways in which markets and governments decide how to produce and distribute goods and services. We outline the main ways in which various institutions of American government influence people’s economic behavior through available instruments of economic policy, and we look at how such policies are fought over, decided on and implemented. We also give attention to how well or how poorly the actual consequences of government economic policies tend to match the policy-makers’ original intentions and to how significant unintended consequences of policy often turn out to be. Because economic resources can be used to seek political power and influence, and because political influence is often used to acquire or protect economic advantages, the analysis of political behavior is also highly relevant to investigating whether capitalist economic institutions and liberal democratic political institutions are mutually compatible or fundamentally antagonistic in the long run. In what ways do American economic institutions and practices support and/or undermine political freedom and democracy? In what ways do the institutions and practices of American politics support and/or undermine the efficient functioning of a basically market economy

Course Objectives

This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the following learning outcomes identified by Coppin State University as expected of all graduates:

LO 1.  Analysis of new and concrete concepts related to American Political Economy.

LO 2.  Appreciate the value of participation to become an effective and informed citizen of the world.

LO 3. Oral and written political communication

LO 4. Critique American political economy issues.

LO 5.  Debate American political economy issues.

LO 6. React and reflect on current and contemporary issues of American political economy

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to;

  • Demonstrate ability to analyze new and concrete concepts related to American political economy.( LO 1, 4 and 5)
  • Display an understanding of how domestic politics influence American political economy
  • .( LO 2)
  • Display an understanding of how the economic relations between states influence domestic and international politics.( LO 1, and 6)
  • Recognize and evaluate the basic debates and issues in American political economy. ( LO 4, IO 5 & 6)
  • Display an understanding of how the political relations between states influence domestic and international economics .( LO 4)
  • Analyze current American political economy events by applying prior knowledge in political science and economics and skills developed in this course. . ( LO 1 )
  • Synthesize a frame of reference for the interpretation and analysis of why do governments adopt the economic policies they do? Why do states manage to cooperate economically in some cases but not others?, and why do governments promote or oppose globalization under different circumstances?.  (LO 1 and LO 6)
  • Develop oral and written political  communication skills to enable him/her to navigate the American political economy process.( LO 3)
  • Analyze informational materials about the influence of multinational Corporations and International Development organizations such as the World Trade Organization, the World Bank Group, the International Monetary Fund, Regional Development Organizations and Regional Trade Agreements on American political economy.( LO 1)

Instructional Material

Required readings:

1- Randall Holcombe, Public Sector Economics, The Role of Government in the American Economy, (Pearson Education, Inc), 2006, ISBN 0-13-145042-5

2 –  Please review weekly current issues or events related to American Political Economy in the following publications to be able to apply this events or issues when doing your weekly homework:

A – The Economist: (available at CSU’s Library), every week The Economist analyzes the important APE happenings around the globe.

B – The Financial Times: (available at CSU’s Library), featuring international news and analysis from journalists in more than 50 countries, The Financial Times provides insights and perspectives on political and economic developments around the world.

3 – Suggested readings and resources to be used in your final research project, Please see Bibliography pages 17 to the end of the Syllabus, and course documents

Teaching strategy/ or methodology.

American political economy (APE) is an interdisciplinary field.  We will be incorporating theories and bodies of knowledge from various disciplines such as political science, economics, sociology, international trade and finance and law. Group discussion, analytical group assignments, case study methods which include panel presentations on the Blackboard forum to provide the students with an interesting learning experience in applying the literature concepts will be utilized.  Videos depicting practical applications of the theories of American Political Economy will be used to enable the student to analyze recent world affairs by watching current streaming videos from major news providers.

Grading Criteria (Mode of Evaluation)

1 – Mid- Term Exam (covers chapter 1 to chapter 5)                                                                            30%

2 – Five homework of the first five chapters( Questions for Review & Discussions)                      20%

3 – Individual critique (a written critique of an article from the list of periodicals related to the field of politics , not to exceed 3 typed pages, please see additional information below)                              10%

4 –Individual or Group Research Project and Power Point Presentation (for details, please go to additional information below).                                                                                                                   30%                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   5 – Group Discussion: discus and or debate with the instructor and two other members of the class three current political issues in a timely fashion (weekly)                                                                      10

Additional Information  

1– Mid-term Exam . The Exams will be consisted of multiple choice, and essay questions. Complete review of the Mid-Term will be provided on time. Each exam must be taken on the day and at the time for which it is scheduled. There will be no make-up examinations except in the case of documented emergencies.

2 – Five homework: answer the review questions of the first five chapters of the Text. This homework will prepare you for the midterm exam

                                                                 Written assignments(Two)

3 –Written Critique of an Article from a professional journal related to the field of American Political Economy.

The Critique must address the following:

  1. The main theme of the article
  2. Its relationship to this course
  3. Significance
  4. Taking a position from the authors’ view (your opinion)

The written critique must conform to the following guidelines: one inch margins on all sides, proper citations, double spaced, numbered pages on the bottom center of each page, and a cover sheet the written part should not exceed four typed pages. The date for each student’s presentation will be determined during the first session.

 

 The following are examples of scholarly and professional periodicals related to the field of American Political Economy:

American Political Science Review

American Economic Review

American Journal of Political Science

Academy of Management Journal

Academy of Management Review

Bell Journal of Economics and Management Science

Comparative Political Studies

Constitutional Political Economy

Columbia Journal of World Business

Competition& Change

Economics and Politics

European Journal of Political Economy

Global Environmental Politics

Harvard Business Review

HR Magazine

International Organization

International Interactions

International Security

International Political Economy

International Studies Quarterly

Journal of Common Market Studies

Journal of International Business

Journal of International Affairs

Journal of Economic Literature

Journal of Conflict Resolution

International Political Economy

Management International Review

Management Review

Management Science

Michigan Business Review

New Political Economy

Review of International Political Economy

Third World Quarterly

Politics and Society

World Politics    

 

4 – Individual or Group Research Project accompanied by Power Point Presentation

 

A research paper on a topic related to the field of American Political Economy is required for this course. Please begin working on this assignment as early during the semester as possible to attain the best results! The instructor must approve all topics. Utilize all available data sources including, but not limited to: periodicals, books, interviews with officials, electronic data sources (e.g. internet, www, list serves’, etc). The research paper is to be at least 15 pages in length (not including the cover sheet), typed, double spaced, one inch margins on all sides, with a cover page indicating the topic and your name centered approximately half way from the top of the cover. The lower right-hand side of the cover should indicate the name and number of the course, the semester, the name of the instructor, and the date.  You may use computer graphics only on the cover page. The pages are to be numbered on the bottom center of each page.

 

Outline is due on the fifth class meeting – one page typed accompanied by the bibliography. Each participant will choose an American Political Economy problem or Challenge, and address the following:

  1. Executive Summary
  2. Problem statement – It should include a broad research question and Sub questions related to American political economy
  3. Historical background of the problem or contributing factors at the national, regional and or international level.
  4. The main players or actors who contributed to this problem.
  5. Discussion of the related American Political Economy literature.
  6. Alternative solutions (in the form of public policy or program) as to how this problem can be alleviated at the national and or international level.
  7. How each alternative can be implemented at the national or international level?
  8. Develop approach for the US Government to implement each alternative at the national or international level.

I – Develop a mechanism to evaluate each Policy or program at the national or international level.

(Participants are encouraged to develop Graphs, matrices, and or tables for each alternative they will develop)

  1. Resources utilized/references, footnotes, bibliography

The individual (or group) is required to make a (Power Point) presentation for the research project.  It should not exceed 15 minutes, followed by opening the floor for questions and feedback from the participants.

The project should be prepared in consultation with the instructor.  It should be written in double space, typewritten form in accordance with the formats used in an acceptable term paper.  You may consult for this purpose APA( American Physiological Association Standard Manual for Writing), or Kate L.Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 1997.

 

Writing Standards:  Written assignments must meet the requirements for the Standards for a “C” Paper (Contents, Organization, Style/Expression and Grammar/Mechanics), in accordance with The Writing Standard Document.  Allow enough time for correction of English, spelling and typing errors.  Students who need assistance with writing should go to the Academic Resource Center.

 

Writing Standards for a “C” Paper

 

  1. Organization

The “C” paper has a discernible and logical plan. It has a focus, and the writer maintains the focus throughout the essay. The writer has unified the entire essay in support of the central idea, or thesis, and individual paragraphs in support of subordinate points. Some individual paragraphs, however, may be weak. The writer promotes coherence through the logical order of paragraphs and the use of some or of the following devices: thesis statement, topic sentences, opening and closing paragraphs, and transitions. The use of these devices may lack smoothness, but the writer has achieved an acceptable level of organization.

 

  1. Content

The “C” paper fulfills the assignment, meeting all specified requirements, such as subject, organization, and length, and reflects the author’s awareness of audience and purpose. The paper presents a central idea supported by relevant material (facts, figures, examples, quotations, or other details). The reasoning is sound; arguments are supported with adequate evidence. Other points of view are acknowledged and responded to as appropriate.  Sources of information are accurately presented and fully attributed.

 

  1. Style / Expression

The “C” paper uses reasonable stylistic options (tone, word choice, sentence patterns) for its audience and purpose. As a rule, the paper has smooth transitions between paragraphs, although some transitions may be missing or ineffective. The meaning of sentences is clear, although some sentences may be awkward or there may be a lack of variety in sentence patterns. Nonetheless, sentence structure is generally correct, although it may show limited mastery of such elements as subordination, emphasis, sentence variety and length, and modifiers. The paper reflects current academic practices of language use established by professional associations such as the Modern Language Association and the American Psychological Association.

 

  1. Grammar / Mechanics

The “C” paper follows the conventions of standard written U.S. English; thus, it is substantially free of errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation, and mechanics. What errors are present must not impede meaning nor overly distract the reader. The paper reflects current citation and documentation of sources as specified in relevant guidebooks.

 

5 – Group Discussion:  This is an opportunity to enable each student to interact effectively and debate with the instructor and with his/her classmates on three current political issues. Each statement or response or rebut should not exceed three or four paragraphs (By Friday at 5:00 PM)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                         

 

                Grading Rubric for the Course Requirements & Assignments.

 

Criteria ad Grade Excellent : 90 – 100 Points =A Very Good: 80 – 89.99% Points = B

 

Acceptable: 70 – 79.99% Points = C

 

Needs Work: 60 – 69.99% Points =  D

 

Not Acceptable: Below 60 Points = F  
                                 1,  Midterm  Exam (LO 1, and 4)

This is a 300 Junior level course. You are expected to demonstrate ability to analyze new and concrete concepts and solve problems related to APE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exemplary and well organized answers to exam questions. Excellent ability to analyze political science concepts, and terminology related to APE. Able to put his/her descriptive analysis into a sound perspective. Excellent grammar and sentence structure. Able to take position from an issue and defend his/ her position.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are signs of organization, and logical structure. Very good ability of analyzing political science concepts, and terminology related to APE. Somewhat able to put his /her descriptive analysis into a sound perspective. Good grammar and sentence structure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

His or her answers are somewhat organized and logical. Marginal ability of analyzing

Political science concepts and terminology related to APE. Able marginally to put his /her descriptive analysis into a sound perspective. Grammar and sentence structure is fair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 His or her answers are somewhat relevant to the Exam‘s questions. Not able to demonstrate Knowledge of remembering (recalling) appropriate or previously learned political science concepts and Terminologies, poor sentence structure, and grammar.

 

 

 

 

 

His or her answers are not relevant to the Exam’s questions. Not able to demonstrate comprehension of political science concepts, and terminology.

Somewhat confusing. Format was difficult to follow. Transitions of ideas were abrupt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

2 – Article Critique

 

3, and 4 ( LO 3 & 4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 – Individual

 

 

Organization

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Style / Expression

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grammar, Spelling, Punctuation, and Mechanics

 

Written

 

 

The article critique is from the political science periodical listed in the Syllabus. He /she followed the critique’s guidelines in the Syllabus. Excellent grammar and sentence structure. Able to present orally his /her point of view.

 

 

 

 

or Group

 

 

Exemplary; well organized and structured; logical format; moves smoothly from one idea to the  next

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completely accurate. All facts were precise

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exemplary, superior ability to put his/her descriptive analysis into a sound perspective

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sentence structure, spelling and punctuation 0-3 errors

 

 

Assignments

 

 

The article critique is   from a daily news papers, such as Washington Post, or New York Times. He/she followed the critique‘s guidelines in the Syllabus. Very good grammar and sentence structure. Some –what able to present his/her point of view

 

Research

 

 

Very well organized with a logical structure. Most transitions were easy to follow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mostly accurate; a few inconsistencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very well able to put his / her descriptive analysis into a sound perspective

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sentence structure, spelling and punctuation 4-5 errors  (minor issue)

 

 

 

 

 

The article critique is from a daily newspaper such as Washington Post or New York Times. He/ or she did not follow the critique’s guidelines in the Syllabus. Grammar and sentence structure is fair. He /she tried to present one’s point of view, but it was not clear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project

 

 

Standards for a “C” Paper

The “C” paper has a discernible and logical plan. It has a focus, and the writer maintains the focus throughout the essay. The writer has unified the entire essay in support of the central idea, or thesis, and individual paragraphs in support of subordinate points. Some individual paragraphs, however, may be weak. The writer promotes coherence through the logical order of paragraphs and the use of some or of the following devices: thesis statement, topic sentences, opening and closing paragraphs, and transitions. The use of these devices may lack smoothness, but the writer has achieved an acceptable level of organization.

 

The “C” paper fulfills the assignment, meeting all specified requirements, such as subject, organization, and length, and reflects the author’s awareness of audience and purpose. Thpaper presents a central idea supported by relevant material (facts, figures, examples, quotations, or other details). The reasoning is sound; arguments are supported with adequate evidence. Other points of view are acknowledged and responded to as appropriate.  Sources of information are accurately presented and fully attributed.

 

 

The “C” paper uses reasonable stylistic options (tone, word choice, sentence patterns) for its audience and purpose. As a rule, the paper has smooth transitions between paragraphs, although some transitions may be missing or ineffective. The meaning of sentences is clear, although some sentences may be awkward or there may be a lack of variety in sentence patterns. Nonetheless, sentence structure is generally correct, although it may show limited mastery of such elements as subordination, emphasis, sentence variety and length, and modifiers. The paper reflects current academic practices of language use established by professional associations such as the Modern Language Association and the American Psychological Association.

 

 

 

The “C” paper follows the conventions of standard written U.S. English; thus, it is substantially free of errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation, and mechanics. What errors are present must not impede meaning nor overly distract the reader. The paper reflects current citation and documentation of sources as specified in relevant guidebooks.  Sentence structure, spelling and punctuation 6-7  errors

 

 

 

 

 

The article critique is from an identified source in the internet. He /or she only summarizes the article without giving one’s point of view. Grammar and sentence structure is not good.

 

 

 

 

 

Not organized; very few ideas presented, but not in consistent manner; transitions were not smooth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not accurate. The facts in the project were misleading to the audience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marginal ability to put his/ her descriptive analysis into a perspective

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sentence structure, spelling and punctuation 8 + errors

 

 

 

 

 

The article critique is from an unidentified source in the internet. He or/she was not able to follow the Syllabus guideline. Grammar and sentence structure is very poor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not organized, ideas presented not related to the topics, no consistency, and no smooth transition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not relevant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not able

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All sentence structure, spelling, and punctuation are wrong

 

 

 

 

 

Research , Oral Presentation, and Length  The research is drawn from a significant number of seminal works and Journals (at least 25, pages and 25 sources) on the primary and secondary topics in the field. Works that provide more in depth discussions of research, techniques and evaluation. The student is able to develop a framework for analysis, develop one’s own graphs/diagrams, and compiling, analyzing and orally presenting data in a clear manner within a sound perspective.

 

 

 

The Research is drawn from a broad range of basic works, in appropriate format, including key journals on primary topics, selected journals and seminal works on secondary topics ( at least 20  pages and 20 sources). The student is less able to develop his/her own framework of analysis, graphs, diagrams, and compiling, analyzing and orally presenting data in a clear manner within a sound perspective. The research is drawn from some  basic works,

Used the material provided in an acceptable manner (at least 15  pages and 15 sources). Did not use any additional recourses, but at a level of effort and quality less than as described in the previous two levels. Student shows a marginal ability to orally present the project and /or defend it.

Did little research on the topic, but at a level of effort and quality less than as described in the previous three levels( at least 10 pages and 10 sources). Student shows less than marginal ability to orally present the project and /or defend it. No research on the topics
Bibliography Bibliography adheres to the APA format. Using both primary and secondary sources of data Bibliography adheres to the APA format. Using only secondary sources of data Bibliography adheres to APA format. 3 – 5 errors Bibliography is not in correct APA format. 5 – 8 errors No Bibliography

 

 

4.  Homework 

 (LO 4,5 and 6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 –Weekly Group Discussions

(LO 3, 5 and 6)

 

 

Exemplary and well organized. Excellent ability of applying political science concepts and terminology to current political events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 well articulated discussions ,demonstrates outstanding involvement in class activities

 

 

There are signs of organization and logical structure. Very good ability of applying political science concepts and terminology to current political events

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Well  articulated discussions, demonstrates very good involvement in class activities

 

 

His or her opinion is somewhat organized, and logical. Marginal ability of applying political science concepts and terminology to current political  events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 not well articulated discussions, demonstrates marginal involvement  in class activities

 

 

 

His or her opinion is not organized and logical. Demonstrates very little ability of applying political science concepts and terminology to current political events

 

1 poorly articulated discussion, demonstrates poor involvement in class activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No weekly discussions,

demonstrates no involvement in class activities

 

 

Word Processing for Written Assignments (Microsoft Word 2007 Preferred)

Blackboard

 

Institutional Guidelines

 

Attendance Policy:  The Schools attendance policy will be strictly observed.

Students are expected to conduct themselves in a civil and professional manner at all times to allow for a conducive learning environment.  Since this course meets only once per week, it is vital that a student attends each class so that s/he does not fall behind.  Missing more than two classes will have an adverse effect on the student’s grade.

 

Writing Standards:  Written assignments must meet the requirements for the Standards for a “C” Paper (Contents, Organization, Style/Expression and Grammar/Mechanics), in accordance with The Writing Standard Document.  Allow enough time for correction of English, spelling and typing errors.  Students who needs assistance with writing should go to the Academic Resource Center.

 

Plagiarism Policy:  It will be taken for granted that any work oral or written, that a student does for any course is his/her original work. Any violation of this rule constitutes plagiarism.  Plagiarism includes any form of cheating on examinations, tests, quizzes and any unacknowledged and/or undocumented use of another’s writing or ideas published or unpublished, including copying or rewording information found on the internet.  A student who plagiarizes will receive a failing grade for the particular assignment.

 

 

Class Schedule, Dates, Reading, Assignment and Activities.

 

Date Reading Assignment/ Activities Deadlines
 1/3/2017

 

 

Introduction, Course requirements and deadlines, Reviewing Coppin State University Policies.

Required:

– Holcombe(Text): Chapter 1, The Public Sector, and Principles for Analyzing Government

 

 

-Weaver, Catherin, “ IPE’s Split Brain”,  New Political Economy, Sept. 2009, Vol.14, Issue 3,P337-346

 

-Holcombe(Text) Chapter:1, and Appendex to Chapter 1Answer Question # 1 to 6 on page 17 with applications on current events from the Economist or the Financial Times

 

 

1/4/2017 Required:

-Text: Chapter 2, Principles for Analyzing Government

 

-Rose, Andrew. “Do We Really Know That the WTO Increases Trade?”,American Economic Review, Vol.94 no.1 (March 2004): 98-114

-Text Chapter 2 .

Answer Questions# 1 to  8  page  44

 

-Review The Economist and The Financial Times for the week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment is due 5:00 PM

 1/ 5/2017 Text: Chapter 3: Property Rights and Economic Efficiency

 

-Mansfield, Edward D., Helen V. Milner. And B. Peter Rosendorff., “” Why Democracies Cooperate More: Electoral Control and International Trade Agreements.” International Organization Vol. 56 no.3(Summer 2002):477-514.

 

 

– Text Chapter 3.

Answer Question # 1 to 11 on page 67 with applications on current events from the Economist or the Financial Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                             

 

 

Assignment is due 5:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

–  Individual Articles Critique IS DUE

 

 

 

 1/ 6 /2017

 

 

Text: Chapter 4 : Externalities

– Fordham, Benjamin O. and Timothy J. McKeown, “Selection and Influence: Interest Groups and Congressional Voting on Trade Policy.” International Organization vol.57 no.3 (Summer 2003): 519-549.

 

 

 

– Text Chapter 4.

Answer Question # 1 to 11  page 89 with applications on current events from the Economist or the Financial Times

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment is due 5:00 PM

 

 

 

 1/ 7/2017 Text Chapter: 5 : Public Goods.

 

– Text  Chapter .

Answer Question # 1 to 9,   on page 107 with applications on current events from the Economist or the Financial Times

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment is due 5:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-Outline is due for the final Research Project

 

 1/8 /2017 Text Chapter 6: The Economic Role of the State

-Milner, Helen V. and Keiko Kubota. “Why the Move to Free Trade? Democracy and

Trade Policy in the Developing Countries.” International Organization vol.59 no.1 (Winter 2005): 107-143.

 

 

– Text Chapter 6:

Answer Question # 1 to 11,  on pages 127 and 128 with applications on current events from the Economist or the Financial Times

 

 

Review for the Midterm Exam

 

 

 

 

Assignment is due 5:00 PM

 

 1/9/2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mid-Term Exam

ONLIN from 7:00 to 10:00 PM

   

 

 

 1/ 10 /2017 Text Chapter 7 : A Theory of Collective Action.

-Mutti. “Taxes, Tariffs, and Transfer Pricing in Multinational

Corporate Decision Making.” Review of Economics and Statistics vol.73 no.2 (May 1991): 285-293.

 

 

 

–   Text Chapter 7.

Answer Question # 1 to 10  on page 152 and 153 with applications on current events from the Economist or the Financial Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment is due 5:00 PM

 

 1/11 /2017 Text Chapter 8: Public Sector Demand

Blonigen, Bruce A. “A Review of the Empirical Literature on FDI Determinants.” National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers Series No 11299 (May 2005).

– dos Santos, Theotonio. “The Structure of Dependence.” American Economic Review

vol.60 no.2 (May 1970, Papers and Proceedings of the 82nd Annual Meeting of the American Economic Association): 213-236.

 

 

 

– Text  Chapter 8.

Answer Question # 1 to 10,   on page 173 and 174 with applications on current events from the Economist or the Financial Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment is due 5:00 PM

 

 1/ 12/2017 Text Chapter 9 : Supply and Demand in Political Markets

– McNamara, Kathleen. “Consensus and Constraints: Ideas and Capital Mobility in

European Monetary Integration.” Journal of Common Market Studies vol.37 no.3 (September 1999): 455-476.

 

 

 

 

 

 

– Text Chapter 9.

Answer Question # 1 to 12  on page 196 and 197 with applications on current events from the Economist or the Financial Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment is due 5:00 PM

 

 1/13 /2017 -Text Chapter :10 Positive Principles of Taxation

– Mearsheimer, John J. “The False Promise of International Institutions.” International

Security vol.19 no.3(Winter 1994/95): 5-49.

– Maggi, Giovanni. “The Role of Multilateral Institutions in International Trade Cooperation.” American Economic Review vol.89 no.1 (March 1999): 190-214.

 

 

 

 – Text   Chapter 10.

Answer Question #1 to 11, on page 223 with applications on current events from the Economist or the Financial Times

 

 

 

 

Assignment is due 5:00 PM

 

1/14/2017 Text Chapter 11:  Principles of Tax Policy.

– Bernhard, William and David Leblang. “Democratic Institutions and Exchange Rate Commitments.” International Organization vol.53 no.1 (Winter 1999): 71-97.

– Gould, Erica R. “Money Talks: Supplementary Financiers and International Monetary Fun Conditionality.” International Organization vol.57 no.3 (Summer 2003): 551-586.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Work on your final research project by drawing from the topics from chapter 12 to 24

 

 

1/15, 16, and 18 /2017 Text Chapters: 12,13,14,15,and 16: Taxes on Economic Transaction, The Taxation of Income, Personal Income Taxation in the United States, Taxes on Business Income and Wealth, and The Tax System in the United States  Same as above

 

 

 

1/19, 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24 /2017

 

 

Text Chapters: 17, 18, 19,20, 21, 22, 23, and 24: The Government Budgeting Process, Taxation and Redistribution, Government Redistribution Programs, Social Security, Education, Health Care, National Defense, and the Federal System of Government  

 

 

 

Same as Above

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Power Point Presentations of the Final Research Project, and the Research Project is due 1, 24, 2017  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                            Bibliography

 

 

Articles

 

Ferdi De Villea & Gabriel Siles-Brüggeb,” The Transatlantic Trade and

Investment Partnership and the Role of Computable General Equilibrium       Modelling: An Exercise in ‘Managing Fictional Expectations’, Centre for European Union Studies, Ghent University, Universiteitsstraat 8, 9000 Ghent, Belgium

b School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford

Road, M13 9PL, Manchester, UK Published online: 06 Dec 2014.

 

Frieden, Jeffry A. and Lisa L. Martin. “International Political Economy: Global and

Domestic Interactions.” In Political Science: The State of the Discipline, edited by Ira Katznelson and Helen V. Milner. New York: W. W. Norton for the American Political Science Association, 2002: 118-146.

 

Thomson, William. “The Young Person’s Guide to Writing Economic Theory.” Journal

of Economic Literature vol.37 no.1 (March 1999): 157-183.

 

Gowa, Joanne. “Bipolarity Multipolarity, and Free Trade.” American Political Science

Review vol.83 no.4 (December 1989): 1245-1256.

 

 

Gowa, Joanne and Edward D. Mansfield. “Alliances, Imperfect Markets, and Major-

Power Trade.” International Organization vol.58 no.4 (Fall 2004): 775-805.

 

Mansfield, Edward D. and Eric Reinhardt. “Multilateral Determinants of Regionalism:

The Effects of GATT/WTO on the Formation of Preferential Trading Arrangements” International Organization vol.57 no.4 (Fall 2003): 829-862.

 

Epstein, David and Sharyn O’Halloran. “The Partisan Paradox and the U.S. Tariff.”

International Organization vol.50 no.2 (Spring 1996): 301-324.

 

Mansfield, Edward D., Helen V. Milner, and B. Peter Rosendorff. “Why Democracies

Cooperate More: Electoral Control and International Trade Agreements.” International Organization vol.56 no.3 (Summer 2002): 477-514.

 

Alt, James E., et al. “The Political Economy of International Trade: Enduring Puzzles and an Agenda for Inquiry.” Comparative Political Studies vol.29 no.6 (December 1996): 689-717.

 

 

Glaeser, Edward L. and Andrei Shleifer. “The Rise of the Regulatory State.” Journal of

Economic Literature vol.41 no.2 (June 2003): 401-425.

 

Mattli, Walter and Tim Buthe. “Setting International Standards: Technological

Rationality or Primacy of Power?” World Politics vol.56 no.1 (October 2003): 1-42.

 

Potoski, Matthew and Aseem Prakash. “Regulatory Convergence in Nongovernmental

Regimes? Cross-National Adoption of ISO 14001 Certifications.” Journal of Politics vol.66 no.3 (August 2004): 885-905.

 

Keleman, Daniel R. and Eric C. Sibbitt. “The Globalization of American Law.”

International Organization vol.58 no.1 (Winter 2004): 103-136.

 

Abbott, Kenneth W. and Duncan Snidal. “Why States Act Through Formal International

Organizations” Journal of Conflict Resolution vol.42 no.1 (February 1998): 3-32.

 

Koremenos, Barbara, Charles Lipson and Duncan Snidal. “The Rational Design of

International Institutions” and “Rational Design: Looking Back to Move Forward.” International Organization vol.55 no.4 (Autumn 2001): 761-799; 1051-1082.

 

Broz, Lawrence J. and Jeffrey A. Frieden. “The Political Economy of International Monetary Relations.” Annual Review 2001): 317-343.

 

 

Haggard, Stephan and Sylvia Maxfield. “The Political Economy of Financial

Internationalization in the Developing World.” International Organization vol.50 no.1 (Winter 1996): 35-68.

 

Lukauskas, Arvid J. and Susan Minushkin. “Explaining Styles of Financial Market

Opening in Chile, Mexico, South Korea, and Turkey.” International Studies Quartely vol.44 no.4 (December 2000): 695-723.

 

Simmons, Beth A. and Zachary Elkins. “The Globalization of Liberalization: Policy

Diffusion in the International Political Economy.” American Political Science Review vol.98 no.1 (February 2004): 171-189.

 

Li, Quan and Adam Resnick. “Reversal of Fortunes: Democratic Institutions and   Foreign Direct Investment Inflows to Developing Countries.” International Organization vol.57 no.1 (Winter 2003): 175-211.

 

Doner, Richard F., Bryan K. Ritchie, and Dan Slater. “Systemic Vulnerability and the

Origins of Developmental States: Northeast and Southeast Asia in Comparative Perspective.” International Organization vol.59 no.2 (Spring 2005): 327-361.

 

Dunning, Thad. “Conditioning the Effects of Aid: Cold War Politics, Donor Credibility,

and Democracy in Africa.” International Organization vol.58 no.2 (Spring 2004): 409-423.

 

Bates, Robert H. and Da-Hsiang Donald Lien. “A Note on Taxation, Development, and

Representative Government” Politics and Society vol.14 no.1 (1985): 53-70.

 

Rodrik, Dani. “Why Do More Open Economies Have Bigger Governments?” Journal of

Political Economy vol.106 no.5 (October 1998): 997-1032.

 

Basinger, Scott J. and Mark Hallerberg. “Remodeling the Competition for Capital: How

Domestic Politics Erases the Race to the Bottom.” American Political Science Review vol.98 no.2 (May 2004): 261-276.

 

Pitruzzello, Salvatore. “Trade Globalization, Economic Performance, and Social

Protection: Nineteenth Century British Laissez-Faire and Post-World War II U.S-Embedded Liberalism.” International Organization vol.58 no.4 (Fall 2004): 705-744.

 

Mares, Isabela. “Social Protection Around the World: External Insecurity, State Capacity

and Domestic Political Cleavages.” Comparative Political Studies vol.38 no.6 (August 2005): 623-651.

 

Rudra, Nita. “Globalization and the Decline of the Welfare State in Less-Developed

Countries.” International Organization vol.56. no.2 (Spring 2002): 411-445.

 

Wibbels, Erik and Moises Arce. “Globalization, Taxation, and Burden-Shifting in Latin

America.” International Organization vol.57 no.1 (Winter 2003): 111-136.

 

Buthe, Tim. “Governance through Private Authority? Non-State Actors in World

Politics.” Journal of International Affairs vol.58 no.1 (Fall 2004): 281-290.

 

Sell, Susan K. and Assem Prakash. “Using Ideas Strategically: The Contest between

Business and NGO Networks in Intellectual Property Rights.” International Studies Quarterly vol.48 no.1 (March 2004): 143-175.

 

Krauthammer, Charles. “The Unipolar Moment Revisited.” The National Interest no.70

(Winter 2002/03): 5-17.

 

Hays, Jude C., Sean D. Ehrlich, and Clint Peinhardt. “Government Spending and Public

Support for Trade in the OECD: An Empirical Test of the Embedded Liberalism    Thesis.” International Organization vol.59 no.2 (Spring 2005): 473-494.

 

Rodrik, Dani. “Why Do More Open Economics Have Bigger Governments?” Journal of

Political Economy vol.106 no.5 (October 198): 997-1032.

 

Mosley, Layna, and David Andrew Singer. “Taking Stock Seriously: Equity-Market

Performance, Government Policy, and Financial Globalization,” International Studies Quarterly vol.52 no.2 (June 2008): 405-425.

 

de Soysa, Indra and Eric Neumayer. “False Prophet or Genuine Savior? Assessing the

Effects of Economic Openness on Sustainable Development, 1980-1999.” International Organization vol.59 no.3 (Summer 2005): 731-772.

 

Adsera, Alicia and Charles Boix. “Trade, Democracy, and the Size of the Public Sector:

The Political Underpinnings of Openness.” International Organization vol.56 no.2 (Spring 2002): 229-262.

 

Wibbels, Erik. “Dependency Revisited: International Markets, Business Cycles, ad Social

Spending in the Developing World.” International Organization vol.60 no.2 (Spring 2006): 433-468.

 

Richards, David L., and Ronald Gelleny, 2007. “Women’s Status and Economic

Globalization.” International Studies Quarterly vol.51 no.4 (December 2007): 855-876.

 

Books

 

Paul D’ Anieri, International Politics, Power and Purpose in Global Affairs, Third Edition, Cengage Learning, United States, 2014.

 

Sobel, C. Andrew, International Political Economy In Context, Sage, Washington DC, 2013.

 

Oately, Thomas, International Political Economy, Edition No. 5, Longman, New York, 2012.

 

Cohn, Theodore H., Global Political Economy, Edition No. 6, Longman, New York, 2012

 

Jackson, Robert and Sqrensen, Introduction To International Relations, Oxford University Press, Oxford, U.K., 2013

 

Biddle, W. Samuels, A Companion to the History of Economic Thought, 2nd edn, Oxford: Blackwell, 2007

 

Lamy, Steven L., Baylis, John, Smith, Steve, and Owens, Patricia, Introduction To Global Politics, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2013.

 

Woods, N, The Globalizes: The IMF, the World Bank, and Their Borrowers, Cornell University Press, New York, 2006.

 

Stiglitz, J.E, Freefall: America, Free Markets, and the Sinking of the World Economy, W.W.Norton, New York, 2010.

 

Rodrick, D., The New Global Economy and Developing Countries: Making Openness Work, Overseas Development Council, Washington, DC, 1999.

 

Palan, R., Global Political Economy: Contemporary Theories, Routledge, London, 2000.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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